Boomers Blog

Should We Fear Shortened Telomeres?

Wednesday, August 08, 2018

By: Genetic Science Learning Center




Inside the nucleus of a cell, our genes are arranged along twisted, double-stranded molecules of DNA called chromosomes. At the ends of the chromosomes are stretches of DNA called telomeres, which protect our genetic data, make it possible for cells to divide, and hold some secrets to how we age and get cancer.
















Telomeres have been compared with the plastic tips on shoelaces, because they keep chromosome ends from fraying and sticking to each other, which would destroy or scramble an organism's genetic information.














Yet, each time a cell divides, the telomeres get shorter. When they get too short, the cell can no longer divide; it becomes inactive or 

"senescent" or it dies. 






















This shortening process is associated with aging, cancer, and a higher risk of death. So telomeres also have been compared with a bomb fuse.


















Cells normally can divide only about 50 to 70 times, with telomeres getting progressively shorter until the cells become senescent or die.










Telomeres do not shorten in tissues where cells do not continually divide, such as heart muscle.




Without telomeres, chromosome ends could fuse together and corrupt the cell's genetic blueprint, possibly causing malfunction, cancer, or cell death.


 Because broken DNA is dangerous, a cell has the ability to sense and repair chromosome damage. 

















Without telomeres, the ends of chromosomes would look like broken DNA, and the cell would try to fix something that wasn't broken. That also would make them stop dividing and eventually die.





















Before a cell can divide, it makes copies of its chromosomes so that both new cells will have identical genetic material. To be copied, a chromosome's two DNA strands must unwind and separate.











 An enzyme (DNA polymerase) then reads the existing strands to build two new strands. It begins the process with the help of short pieces of RNA. 








When each new matching strand is complete, it is a bit shorter than the original strand because of the room needed at the end for this small piece of RNA. It is like someone who paints himself into a corner and cannot paint the corner.













As a cell begins to become cancerous, it divides more often, and its telomeres become very short. If its telomeres get too short, the cell may die. Often times, these cells escape death by making more telomerase enzyme, which prevents the telomeres from getting even shorter.








Many cancers have shortened telomeres, including pancreatic, bone, prostate, bladder, lung, kidney, and head and neck.







Measuring telomerase may be a way to detect cancer. And if scientists can learn how to stop telomerase, they might be able to fight cancer by making cancer cells age and die. 





In one experiment, researchers blocked telomerase activity in human breast and prostate cancer cells growing in the laboratory, prompting the tumor cells to die. But there are risks. Blocking telomerase could impair fertility, wound healing, and production of blood cells and immune system cells.






Some long-lived species like humans have telomeres that are much shorter than species like mice, which live only a few years. Nobody knows why. But it's evidence that telomeres alone do not dictate lifespan.











Cawthon's study found that when people are divided into two groups based on telomere length, the half with longer telomeres lives an average of five years longer than those with shorter telomeres. 


This study suggests that lifespan could be increased five years by increasing the length of telomeres in people with shorter ones.
















People with longer telomeres still experience telomere shortening as they age. How many years might be added to our lifespan by completely stopping telomere shortening? Cawthon believes 10 years and perhaps 30

years.







Boomers Forever Young has always been aware of the importance of Human Telomarase for the anti-aging process and because of this we focused on having products like Boomer Boost and our Boomer Barley that specifically address these type of issues. 



Boomer Boost is scientifically formulated so that all of the 70 different nutrients, minerals, vitamins and amino acids are in the correct ratios and work in synergy to provide optimal nutrition to your cells.




Boomer Barley is a Complete Source of Amino Acids and Metabolic Enzymes that facilitate the regeneration process of Human Telomerase.





Get Your Essential Pack Today!





For more information or to get your supply click on the image below:








ttps://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/basics/telomeres/



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