Boomers Blog

The Diabolical truth about Diabetes

Wednesday, April 18, 2018






There is a staggering amount of misinformation on diabetes, a growing epidemic that afflicts more than 29 million people in the United States today. The sad truth is this: it could be your very OWN physician perpetuating this misinformation





Most diabetics find themselves in a black hole of helplessness, clueless about how to reverse their condition. The bigger concern is that more than half of those with type 2 diabetes are NOT even aware they have diabetes — and 90 percent of those who have a condition known as prediabetes aren’t aware of their circumstances, either.







Diabetes: Symptoms of an Epidemic

1979 to 1980 (11.2%)

2003 to 2006 (25.9%)

2005 to 2006 (29.5%)

2007 to 2009 (25%)

2020 (36.8%)






The latest diabetes statistics echo an increase in diabetes cases, both diagnosed and undiagnosed. By some estimates, diabetes has increased more than 700 percent in the last 50 years!



At least 29 million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and another 86 million are prediabetic.



What’s hidden behind this medical smokescreen is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable. The cure lies in a true understanding of the underlying cause (which is impaired insulin and leptin sensitivity) and implementing simple, inexpensive lifestyle adjustments that spell phenomenal benefits to your health.






Type 1 Diabetes and Insulin Dependence






  • Also known as diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes is a chronic health condition traditionally characterized by elevated levels of glucose in your blood, often simply called “high blood sugar.”

  • Type 1 diabetes – dubbed “juvenile onset diabetes” – is the relatively uncommon type, affecting only about 1 in 250 Americans. Occurring in individuals younger than age 20, it has no known cure.






What’s most concerning about juvenile diabetes is that, these numbers have been going up steadily right along with type 2 diabetes: for non-Hispanic white youths ages 10 to 14, the rates have risen 24 percent in the past few decades.




But even more significant is that for black children, they’ve gone up 200 percent! And, according to recent studies, these numbers are predicted to double by 2020 for all youth.













In type 1 diabetes, your own immune system ravages the insulin-producing cells of your pancreas. The result is a loss of the hormone insulin. Type 1 diabetics need to be supplemented with insulin for the rest of their lives as failure to do so will rapidly result in death. At the current time, other than a pancreas transplant there is no known cure for type 1 diabetes.














Type 2 Diabetes: Virtually 100 Percent Curable





The far more common form of diabetes is type 2, which affects 90 to 95 percent of diabetics. In this type, your body produces insulin but is unable to recognize and use it properly. It is considered an advanced stage of insulin resistance. Insulin resistance allows glucose in your body to increase and cause a host of complications.







The signs of diabetes may all be there, but the often-overlooked fact is that type 2 diabetes is completely preventable and nearly 100 percent curable. Some of the signs that you may be diabetic are:






Excessive thirst

Extreme hunger (even after eating)

Nausea and possible vomiting

Unusual gain weight or loss

Increased fatigue

Irritability

Blurred vision

Slow healing of wounds

Frequent infections (skin, urinary, and vaginal)

Numbness or tingling in hands and/or feet















How They Got It All Wrong About Diabetes






Diabetes is NOT a disease of blood sugar, but rather a disorder of insulin and leptin signaling that evolves over a long period of time, moving first into a prediabetes state, and then to full-blown diabetes if left unchecked. One reason mainstream medicine largely fails in treating diabetes with anything other than insulin shots or pills – and sometimes even worsens it – is because it refuses to act on this underlying cause. Insulin sensitivity is key in this matter.








The purpose of your pancreas is to produce the hormone insulin and secrete it into your bloodstream, thereby regulating your glucose at the levels your body needs to live.





Leading Complications of Diabetes

The function of insulin, then, is to act as a source of energy for your cells. In other words you NEED insulin to live, and normally your pancreas does its job of providing your body with just the right amount. But certain risk factors and other circumstances may put your pancreas at risk of not functioning properly.










Risk Factors for Type 2 Diabetes(Source: The National Diabetes Education Program)









Age 45 or older

Overweight or obese

Family history of diabetes

Hypertension

Physical inactivity

Depression

History of gestational diabetes

Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

HDL-C levels under 35mg/dL

Fasting triglycerides over 250 mg/dL

Treatment with atypical antipsychotics, glucocorticoids

Obstructive sleep apnea and chronic sleep deprivation

Certain health conditions associated with insulin resistance

Member of high-risk population (African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native, or Asian American)


Chances are, if you have one or more of these risk factors, or if your blood glucose levels are elevated, you’ll be checked for diabetes and put on insulin, either in pill form or by injection — and sometimes both.




Your doctor will say that the purpose of taking these shots or pills is to lower your blood sugar. He may even explain to you that this is necessary because insulin regulation plays such as an integral role in your health and longevity. He might add that elevated glucose levels not only are symptoms of diabetes, but also of heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, stroke, high blood pressure, cancer, and obesity. And of course, your doctor would be correct in all of that.







But would he or she go beyond that explanation to tell you what part leptin plays in this process, or that when your body develops a resistance to leptin, you’re on your way to diabetes, if you’re not already there?

Probably not.








Diabetes and Leptin and Insulin Resistance







Leptin is a hormone produced in your fat cells. One of its primary roles is to regulate your appetite and body weight. It tells your brain when to eat, how much to eat, and when to stop eating, which is why it’s called the “satiety hormone.” It also tells your brain what to do with the energy it has.




Not very long ago it was determined that mice without any leptin became very obese. Similarly, in humans, when you become leptin resistant, that mimics leptin deficiency and it becomes easy for you to rapidly gain weight.




You can thank the discovery of leptin and its role in the body to Jeffrey M. Friedman and Douglas Coleman, two researchers who discovered this hormone in 1994. Interestingly, Friedman named leptin after the Greek word "leptos", which means “thin,” after he discovered that mice injected with synthetic leptin became more active and lost weight.





But when Friedman also found that obese people have very high levels of leptin in their blood, he decided that something else must be going on. And that “something” was that obesity can cause a resistance to leptin — in other words, the signaling pathway for leptin becomes skewed in obese people, causing the body to over-produce leptin just as it does glucose when you are insulin-resistant.




Friedman and Coleman also discovered that leptin is responsible for the accuracy of insulin signaling and for your insulin resistance.




Thus, the primary role of insulin is NOT to lower your blood sugar, but to store the extra energy (glycogen, a starch) for present and future consumption. Its ability to lower your blood sugar is merely a “side effect” of this energy storage process. Ultimately, what this means is that diabetes is both a disease of insulin and of a malfunction in leptin signaling.






And that’s why “treating” diabetes by merely concentrating on lowering blood sugar can be a dangerous approach. It simply does not address the actual issue of metabolic miscommunication that’s going on in every cell of your body when your leptin and insulin levels are disrupted and stop working together the way they should.






Taking insulin may even spell greater trouble for some type 2 diabetes patients, as it will worsen their leptin and insulin resistance over time. The only known way to reestablish proper leptin (and insulin) signaling is through your diet. And I promise, your diet can have a more profound influence on your health than any known drug or modality of medical treatment.








Boomers Forever Young offers a comprehensive Anti Aging Kit that can address all of the issues that are associated with Diabetes. For more Details or to buy Your Boomers Anti-Aging System



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source: https://www.mercola.com/diabetes.aspx

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